Skip menu

For the latest information on COVID-19 travel restrictions in Italy. Click here.

Jewish Ghetto of Rome

Overview

The district of remembrance where you can experience Jewish culture and try traditional Roman Jewish cuisine.

Located on Lungotevere de' Cenci, one of the oldest in the world, second only to that of Venice, the Ghetto of Rome was founded in 1555 at the behest of Pope Paul IV. Jews who lived here were required to wear a distinctive sign and could not trade or own real estate. Decommissioned several times, it was finally closed in 1870. In 1904, the Great Synagogue of Rome was inaugurated and even today it is a place of worship but also a reference point for the cultural and social life of the entire community. The Temple is one of the most charming places in the district and inside you can visit the Jewish Museum and the Spanish Temple. In addition to the Synagogue, other monuments of interest are the Church of Sant'Angelo in Pescheria, derived from the ancient fish market, where you can admire the Chapel of St. Andrew or even the Church of San Gregorio in Divina Pietà, in honor of Pope Gregory I who granted freedom of worship to Jews, and the Portico d'Ottavia. In the Ghetto is the Turtle Fountain with four bronze ephebes and dolphins resting on shells and on the edge the four turtles, made by Bernini who completed the work.

Strolling through these narrow streets, you will notice that some of the cobblestones are covered with brass plaques, the Memorie d'inciampo, with the names of the deportees who, during the round-up of October 16, 1943, never returned from the extermination camps.

This is the ideal place where to enjoy a gastronomy stop where you can taste the typical kosher cuisine but also the traditional Judaic-Roman cuisine such as artichokes "alla giudia", anchovies and endive pie, fish broth and cod fillets.

Reviews
Reviews
()
Jewish Ghetto of Rome

Largo Stefano Gaj Taché, 00186 Roma RM, Italy

Call +39066840061 Website

Related articles

Explore the surroundings

Nearby